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Available courses

  • Classroom Management

    This course is designed to provide teachers with research based strategies and best practices in the area of classroom management. Teachers will explore the four key components of effective classroom management and pilot these components in their existing classrooms. This course will also afford teachers the opportunity to discuss the importance of enhancing student responsibility for behavior and learning through the power of the teacher and classroom setting.

  • Classroom Management

    This course is designed to provide teachers with research based strategies and best practices in the area of classroom management. Teachers will explore the four key components of effective classroom management and pilot these components in their existing classrooms. This course will also afford teachers the opportunity to discuss the importance of enhancing student responsibility for behavior and learning through the power of the teacher and classroom setting.

  • In this course we will explore the technology that is available to us as members of the Brockton Public Schools community.

  • I am learning about how to use Moodle with my students

  • Welcome to Mr. Ferguson's Biology course.  This is a full year course and students will be taking the MCAS Test in early June.  during this year we will cover certain topics such as Biomolecules, Cells, Genetics, Evolution, Ecology, and Anatomy and Physiology.

  •    

    Robotics 1 & Robotics 2 are one semester classes designed to enhance Technology, Engineering and BHS literacy skills.  There are many “hands on” and academic challenges in this class.

  • Introduction to Computer Aided Design using Autodesk Inventor.

  • Introduction to Drafting and AutoCAD
  •              

    The Goal of this Moodle page is to help you, the student, plot a successful route through your senior year, at Brockton High School.  I recognize that this is a difficult process that is full of many deadlines, new terminology and many, many decisions

  • US History II- Reconstruction to the Present

    Welcome to US History II: Reconstruction to the Present.  In this class we will pick up with where you left off in US History I with the Civil War.  During the course of this class we will cover topics ranging from Immigration to Wars and many things in between.  There will be a focus on US government policies and social changes throughout the many different eras of American History. 

                Whether you like History or not, we will together find many different things in history that you can relate to and understand.  It is my goal that throughout the year you will stay engaged in learning history through the use of many different mediums, our book, movies, documentaries, songs, photos and many primary source documents.  Our class is aligned with the Massachusetts History frameworks, but we try to make it as engaging as possible so that we can cover even more than the standards outline. 

  • By taking this course, students will develop an understanding of major macroeconomic principles, including the allocation of scarce resources, and the economic reasoning used by government agencies and by people acting as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters. Key elements include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade.

  • Freshman World History, the required course for all freshman, is a continuation of the scope and sequence of World History I taught in 8th grade. The course explores the economic and political roots of the modern world, the causes and consequences of the great military events, and the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political, ethic, and religious conflicts around the world.

  • This course is designed to introduce students to Psychology. It is a one semester course that focuses on what psychology is, how it is done, and how we apply it to daily life. We will examine both normal and abnormal thinking and behavior as well as the variety of theories that exist to help explain them. Students will be expected to read, write, speak, and think critically daily. They will also conduct informal and formal research assignments.

  • US History II- Reconstruction to the Present

    Welcome to US History II: Reconstruction to the Present. In this class we will pick up with where you left off in US History I with the Civil War. During the course of this class we will cover topics ranging from Immigration to Wars and many things in between. There will be a focus on US government policies and social changes throughout the many different eras of American History.

    Whether you like History or not, we will together find many different things in history that you can relate to and understand. It is my goal that throughout the year you will stay engaged in learning history through the use of many different mediums, our book, movies, documentaries, songs, photos and many primary source documents. Our class is aligned with the Massachusetts History frameworks, but we try to make it as engaging as possible so that we can cover even more than the standards outline.

  • Work in Progress....

  • Course Description: Welcome to Freshman English! In the freshman year, students will continue to develop their skills as insightful thinkers, speakers, and writers through a close analysis of multiple literary genres. Students will read, contemplate, and generate precise observations about literature and present these observations in oral and written forms. Additionally, students will analyze how writers use literary techniques such as theme, symbolism, and imagery to convey meaning.

     

    Course Outcomes:  In this course, students will

    • read closely to determine the literal and inferential meaning of a text
    • analyze how writers use literary techniques including theme, diction, and text structure to convey meaning or tone
    • complete multiple writing assignments in the following modes: literary, expository, persuasive, and research.
    • strengthen their writing through planning, revising, editing, rewriting, and trying a new approach
    • continue to expand their vocabulary and improve their grammar skills
    • prepare for and participate in small and large group discussions
    • prepare for and present effective oral presentations making the best use of digital media and visual displays
  • This Moodle course aligns directly with the BHS Sophomore English Language Arts Curriculum and the Massachusetts Common Core for English Language Arts. Through this technological exploration of various genres, students will explore the themes of time, identity, individuality, conformity, oppression and ostracism. At the introduction of each theme, students will explore his or her viewpoints on these themes, as well as their classmates’ points of view. As students work their way through the related assignments they will analyze each theme from other’s points of view as communicated through various genres. At the conclusion of each theme, journey students will reflect on how their viewpoints and understanding of each theme has evolved. The work done here will align with the work done in class and at the end of these explorations students will design and produce a project-based summative assessment, working collaboratively with a team investigating their chosen theme and core work of literature to create an artistic representation of their investigation.

  • Language and Composition: Course Description 

    (from the BHS Course of Study: 2010-2011)

    • The Junior Year English program offers students a semester course that reflects the four strands of the Massachusetts English Language Arts Frameworks, with particular emphasis on writing. Students will focus on developing a variety of strategies in writing effective essays. Practice in a process approach to writing will continue.

      In the junior year, the student, as speaker and writer, will observe and address issues of both personal and social interest. The student’s voice will progress from the personal, which is the focus of freshman and sophomore years, to one that explores and analyzes multiple points of view in order to advocate and communicate a position through writing.

      Juniors will read a variety of literature, with an emphasis on nonfiction, presenting writers who use their craft to explain, analyze, and entertain. Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences, students will be instructed in a range of rhetorical techniques to enable them to express ideas with precision, force and artistry. As a result, students will not only be individuals who have something to say, but individuals who have learned a process that will enable them to discover in language what they think, feel, and value.

  • course description: This Junior year English course concentrates on written and verbal communication, including learning and using new rhetorical strategies, such as allusions.
  • AP English Literature and Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone. The AP English Literature course is also writing intensive. Students will complete timed and un-timed essays, formal analytical papers that include critical research, and online discussions. Additionally, students will participate in individual and group presentations and full-class discussions, all of which requires them to speak with clarity, confidence, and precision. The pace in this course is rigorous and the material is challenging. Students will take the AP English Literature and Composition Exam in May and might receive college credit based on their exam score. Students should contact their college or university of interest for information regarding AP credit.

  • BIOLOGY 2

    Chemistry, Taxonomy and Energy

    This semester long course will focus on topics of Biology that deal with biochemistry, taxonomy and energy (cell respiration and photosynthesis).  We will be learning about the process of science as we explore these topics.  The taxonomic hierachy will be explored while examining the interrelated nature of photosynthesis and cellular respiration.

  • Biology 1 - Foundation A    A single semester course designed to meet the MCAS prioritized frameworks 2.1-2.2 (Cells), 6.1-6.4 (Ecology) and 5.1-5.3 (Evolution/Biodiversity).  This course also introduces the key components of the DIPLOMA PLUS model: Science Competencies and Personal Competencies.

  • Journalism is a fun way to get students writing, summarizing and thinking critically. Concise writing, precise word choice, point of view, persuasion, and summarizing are some of the skills students can learn from journalism. Additionally, understanding the way journalists structure and write articles is an important tool for educators and students as non-fiction writing and reading is being more heaving emphasized in curriculum.

  • Chemistry Class

  •                This is a full year course dedicated to teaching students about the modern world.    Emphasis will be placed on both content as well as study skills during the course of the year.  The course will focus on numerous events and themes in accordance with the Massachusetts  Frameworks.  After a brief review of major topics from the 1500s -1700s, the course will take an in-depth look at the 1800s to the present.  The course will be focused on a world view of modern history as the U.S. will only be discussed as part of a greater context.  In addition to historical themes, students will also learn about the various cultures, governments, and economies of many modern nations.                

                    In addition to historical content this course will focus on a variety of study skills that will assist students across the curriculum.  These skills include active reading, analyzing visuals such as graphs and charts, writing skills such as paragraph development and open response writing, and many more.  Strategies for understanding vocabulary in context and test taking strategies will also be developed over the course of the year.  Finally students will learn how to properly organize their materials while developing individual responsibility.      

  • Everything we do in this class is done with the purpose preparing students for the COMPTIA (Computer Technical Industry Association)  A+ certification exam (220-801 and 220-802).   We will also focus our efforts on obtaining the CISCO hardware essentials 1 certification. This will require a great deal of effort.  Students must be mature, dedicated, organized and focused in all aspects of this class.

  • This full year course, normally taken in grade ten, presents concepts of complexity, diversity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth.The course emphasizes the molecular mechanisms underlying continuity and variation as the framework for natural selection.  Other topics will include ecology, evolution, and man’s effect on the biosphere.  This course will prepare students to take the Biology MCAS Exam.In addition to content presented in the course, emphasis will be placed on students’ skill development in the literacy areas of reading, writing, speaking, and reasoning.

  •         

            This course is designed to teach students on the basics of using Moodle and Web 2.0 in the classroom.  The course is divided into two major parts, online discussion and hands on training.  The online discussion is designed to maximize exposure to Moodle and Web 2.0 and provide a framework for future classroom use.  The hands on training will help students overcome technical hurdles and ease anxiety about using unfamiliar software and hardware.  The hands on portion of the class will also help teachers instruct their students on the proper way to use the technology.  The projects, a creation of a Moodle course and a curriculum project, highlights different aspects of Moodle and Web 2.0 and allows students to have a series of lessons ready to go for their first attempt using Moodle and Web 2.0 with their students.

    This course meets for a total of 37 ½ instructional contact hours.

     

  • The MTEL English course is designed to prepare teachers to take the MTEL English exam.  The course will consist of a comprehensive review of the material relative to this test. The course will cover the following components of the exam: literature and language; rhetoric and composition; reading, theory, and instruction; integration of knowledge and understanding; and test-taking techniques.

  • Course Summary:

    This course is designed to prepare teachers to take the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills Test.  It will cover test-taking strategies as well as a comprehensive review of material relative to the Reading and Writing subtests of this particular exam.  The course will be designed and tailored to address the specific needs of each registered class.  In addition, the course will be structured to include provisions for individual instruction.

  • This Course is for the Summer of Work and Learning 2.012


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